Reviews

Zenith Rand—Planet Vigilante review

Print
PDF

Zenith Rand—Planet Vigilante—A review by Craig Clarke

zenith_rand_thumbnail_websiteRichard Tooker was obviously meant to tell stories of adventure. Born in 1902, Tooker's father's family were sea captains, soldiers, and adventurers. The storytelling part came from his mother, who knew the author of the classic adventure Alice of Old Vincennes. Tooker published his first story at the age of 15, then after finishing school, worked as an editor and reporter and was enlisted in the Marines. He felt that his life contained parallels with Jack London's Martin Eden and published his first novel, The Day of the Brown Horde, in 1929 (from whose dustjacket the substance of this paragraph comes).

Tooker's skill at writing cracking sci-fi adventure is well evidenced by Black Dog Books' collection of the three longish stories featuring his hero Zenith Rand, as published in three consecutive issues (June, August, and October 1936) of Mystery Adventure Magazine. Zenith Rand, Planet Vigilante contains the title inaugural tale plus two others, "Revenge on Scylla" and "Angels of Oorn" (the source of the book's appealing cover illustration).

Best of Adventure review at Bish's Beat

Print
PDF

best_of_adv_v1_thumbnail_websitePaul Bishop over at Bish's Beat gives an enthusiastic write-up of our recent title, The Best of Adventure, vol. 1, 1910-1912. He says:

"Wow! Have I been having a blast this week reading this stunning collection from Black Dog Books. Although I’ve actually been reading while lounging in my office armchair, I’ve felt like I’ve been reading by flashlight while curled up under my bedcovers as I did when I was a kid—unable to stop turning the pages."

You can read his complete write up here.

Thanks, Paul!

Five Star Review!

Print
PDF

black_death_thumbnail_websiteOur recent title, The Black Death by Marion Polk Angellotti was given a five-star review by Midwest Book Review on both their own site and on Amazon.

"When your devotion to a cause is gold, one often finds the money is good; it's the people paying that aren't. The Black Death: The Saga of Sir John Hawkwood and the Adventures of White Company uses the life of true to life soldier of fortune John Hawkwood to tell a tale of medieval adventure as Hawkwood and his crew face an unusual collection of adventures of his time, from their wars for hire to the oncoming onslaught of the black death. The Black Death is an exciting read of adventure that is sure to entice and keep people reading."


"The Black Death is an exciting read of adventure that is sure to entice and keep people reading."—MIDWEST BOOK REVIEW (Five Stars).

To purchase a copy of this book visit our The Black Death listing.

The Silver Menace Review

Print
PDF
The Silver Menace and A Thousand Degrees Below Zero by Murray Leinster—A review by Dave Truesdale

silver_menace_thumbnail_websiteMany of SF's now legendary icons began their early careers writing for the pulp magazines. They wrote not only for the science fiction pulp magazines—which genre was finally given a name with the April 1926 issue of Hugo Gernback's Amazing Stories—but for many another title before there even was an "official" science fiction magazine. Early pulp writers would pound the typewriter at lightning speed, cranking out stories for the detective or mystery pulp magazines, or perhaps for the romance or western or adventure magazines at a penny a word if they were lucky, or for those numerous pulps who catered to a general audience and sought all types of stories for their publications—including stories with a scientific rationale that would later be classified as science fiction.

One such early pulp writer was Murray Leinster. Murray Leinster was the pseudonym of Will F(itzgerald) Jenkins (1896–1975). Before he turned 20 Leinster had sold his first story, "The Foreigner," to H. L. Mencken's Smart Set in 1916. He would sell quite regularly to this magazine over the next several years, and began to sell to a plethora of other pulp magazines of the time as well, including magazines catering to the western, romance, jungle, and detective audiences, and stories to the detective genre's most famous pulp Black Mask. When Weird Tales began publishing in 1923, Leinster's stories would soon appear in its hallowed pages. He was a consummate professional and could write for any market.

Blogcritics Review—The Man From Hell

Print
PDF

The Man From Hell—A review by Bill Sherman

In the annals of pulp fiction, the name Arthur Leo Zagat is not one that leaps to the top of the list. Yet the former lawyer turned fictioner was a prolific contributor to American fiction magazines of the thirties and forties, producing hundreds of yarns for mags like Argosy, Dime Mystery Magazine and Astounding Stories. Recently, Black Dog Books, a small press specializing in rescuing obscure works and writers from the glory days of the ten-cent story mags, released a collection of Zagat's horror fiction entitled The Man from Hell. A definite curiosity, it won't dislodged any of the big names from their place in the hierarchy, but it has its moments of cheesy fun.